Parks and green spaces

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PARKS

Champigny Park, 2nd Avenue North
Michel Mastromateo Park, 3rd Avenue and Guy Street
Central Park, between 13th and 15th Avenues
Chenard Park, 28th Avenue and Des Promenades Boulevard
Du Ruisseau Park, Gamble Street
Louis-Warren Park, at the end of Ronsard and Ovila Forget Streets
Laurier-Larouche Park, behind Mountainview School
Gérard-Brault Park, at the corner of 11th Avenue and Lucerne Street
Lucien-Robillard Park, Guy Street
Donat-Ladouceur Park, at the corner of 19th Avenue and Normandie Street
Olympia Park, Guy Street and Des Anciens Road
Mikaël Kingsbury Park, at the crescent of Mathys Street
Régent Park, at the end of Élizabeth Street

Hervé-Doucet Dog Park:

located behind the Larry-Cool pumping station, facing Central Park, on Du Lac Boulevard between 13th Avenue and 15th Avenue

Riverside parks

Armitage Park, alongside 26th Avenue on the shores of Lake of Deux-Montagnes – includes boat ramp
Bélair Park, on the shores of the Mille-Îles River where Old Oka Road crosses Oka Road
Gault Gillespie Park, south of Lakebreeze Street, on the shores of Lake of Deux-Montagnes
Grand-Moulin or Aimé E. Struthers Park, alongside the riverbank at Grand-Moulin Road – includes boat ramp
Moir Park, at the end of 3rd Avenue and the river
Landscaped/managed public grounds at the end of 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th Avenues and on the banks of Lake of Deux-Montagnes.

School Parks

At Des Mésanges School, Oka Road and 14th Avenue
At Saint-Jude School, Saint-Jude and De La Chapelle
At Sauvé School, 9th Avenue and Oka Road
At Des Érables School, De l’Avenir Road

RÉSERVE NATURELLE DU BOISÉ ROGER-LEMOINE

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The City of Deux-Montagnes and the members of the Corporation des boisés et des parcs naturels de Deux-Montagnes are proud to announce that the Boisé-Roger-Lemoine, a 8.14 hectare property located in Deux-Montagnes, is now recognized as a nature reserve under the Natural Heritage Conservation Act. This is the first ever nature reserve to be owned by a municipality.

Composed of a wooded area and a cattail marsh, the Boisé is home to a diverse selection of flora and fauna. The cattail is recognized for its ability to eliminate certain impurities in water. The wooded area is an old hardwood forest that serves as a refuge for plants likely to be endangered or vulnerable in Québec. Therein, we find black ash, red ash, beech, American lime and red elm. Some sugar maples have even been estimated at 225 years old, a rare occurrence in a near-urban forest.

The Woodlands Corporation regularly organizes information sessions, as well as cleanup and maintenance activities  www.lesamisduboise.ca